Coordinated School Health

///Coordinated School Health
Coordinated School Health 2016-11-30T10:09:04+00:00
Coordinated School Health (CSH) consists of eight inter-related components. All Coordinated School Health components work together to improve the lives of students and their families.

2014-2015 School Health Index

Health education is a planned, sequential, pre K-12 curriculum and program that addresses the physical, mental and emotional, and social dimensions of health. The activities of the curriculum and program are integrated into the daily life of the students and designed to motivate and assist students to maintain and improve their health, prevent disease and reduce health-related risk behaviors.
Health services are provided and/or supervised by school health nurses to appraise, protect, and promote the health of students. These services include assessment, planning, coordination of services and direct care for all children, including those with special health care needs.
Nutrition services assure access to a variety of nutritious, affordable and appealing meals in school that accommodate the health and nutrition needs of all students. School nutrition programs reflect the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans and other criteria to meet the complete nutrition needs of students.
Physical education is a planned, sequential pre-k -12 curriculum program that follows national standards in providing developmentally appropriate, cognitive content and learning experiences in a variety of physical activity areas such as basic movement skills; physical fitness; rhythm and dance; cooperative games; team, dual, and individual sports; tumbling and gymnastics; and aquatics. Quality physical education promotes, through a variety of planned individual and cooperative physical activities and fitness assessments, each student’s optimum physical, mental, emotional and social development; and provides fitness activities and sports that all students, including students with special needs, can enjoy and pursue throughout their lives.

Active Education: Growing Evidence on Physical Activity and Academic Performance

The Healthy School Environment component relates to the quality of the physical and aesthetic surroundings; the psychosocial climate, safety, and culture of the school; the school safety and emergency plans; and the periodic review and testing of the factors and conditions that influence the environment.
Counseling, mental health, and social services are provided to assess and improve the mental, emotional, and social health of every student. All students receive these services, including developmental classroom guidance activities and preventative educational programs, in an effort to enhance and promote academic, personal, and social growth. Students who may have special needs are served through the administration and interpretation of psychometric and psychoeducational tests, observational assessments, individual and group counseling sessions, crisis intervention for emergency mental health needs, family/home consultation, and/or referrals to outside community-based agencies when appropriate.
Involvement of students, parents, community representatives, health specialists, and volunteers in schools provides an integrated approach for enhancing the health and well being of students both at school and in the community. School health advisory councils, coalitions, and broadly-based constituencies for school health can build support for school health programs. School administrators, teachers, and school health staff in all components actively solicit family involvement and engage community resources, expertise, and services to respond effectively to the health-related needs of students and families.
Wellness opportunities such as health assessments, health education and physical fitness activities are provided to all school staff, including the administrators, teachers and support personnel, to improve their health status. These opportunities encourage staff to pursue a healthy lifestyle that contributes to their improved health status, improved morale, and greater personal commitment to the overall coordinated school health program. This personal commitment often transfers into greater commitment to the health of students and serving as positive role models. Health promotion activities conducted on-site improve productivity, decrease absenteeism, and reduce health insurance costs.